company culture

Chief technology officer mentors youth in computer science

Numerous continued team members are giving back to their communities in extraordinary ways. 

As part of the company’s commitment to its culture, continued offers a gift match program or one paid day off each year to participate in a charitable activity. These programs make it possible for team members to offer their time or monetary contributions to the organizations most meaningful to them. 

From feeding the hungry to mentoring disadvantaged youth or volunteering with animal shelters, our team members’ service efforts span a variety of causes and are making a difference across the country. 

“The fact our company supports volunteerism makes a huge difference in our ability to serve,” said Carolyn Smaka, AuD, continued editor in chief.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

SEE HOW CONTINUED TEAM MEMBER ANTONIO LLANOS GIVES BACK:

Antonio LlanosThe value of volunteerism was instilled in Antonio Llanos from a young age. From volunteering at his local county fair in high school to serving his undergraduate alma mater, Georgia Institute of Technology, in a variety of ways for 20+ years, he has always maintained a commitment to giving back to others. 

With more than 25 years of technology and leadership experience, Llanos feels a responsibility to mentor youth in hopes of inspiring future leaders in his field. He recently joined forces with Microsoft Philanthropies’ Technology Education and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) program and was assigned to an area high school near his South Florida home. 

TEALS connects classroom teachers with tech-industry volunteers such as Llanos through remote and in-classroom learning to create sustainable computer science and technology education programs. 

“There is a high barrier to entry in the technology field,” said Llanos, CTO for continued and sister company Simucase. “Kids need computers, highly specialized instruction that isn’t always available in high schools, and someone to help them. It’s very important that people in my profession mentor the next generation so kids are exposed to the field at a young age and gain access to resources they need to pursue it.” 

“It’s very important that people in my profession mentor the next generation so kids are exposed to the field at a young age and gain access to resources they need to pursue it.” 

Llanos partners with other TEALS mentors to teach AP computer science virtually to over a dozen high school students at Barbara Goleman Senior High School in Miami Lakes, Florida. 

“This course is heavy duty and not for the faint of heart, but I’m here to share knowledge so more people can learn about the field,” Llanos said. “I hope I change how people think about the industry and even compel some to pursue it. If even one person I mentor in this program goes on to pursue computer science, it will have been worth it.”

More information on volunteering with TEALS

01.26.21


Related Posts:

Courses that count: CE admin team meets members' continuing education needs

Meet the team that oversees course compliance, renewal cycles, reporting, and more...

03.12.20

Team continued: six sides to Melissa Freund

continuing education manager for AudiologyOnline discusses love of the job...

03.12.19